Letter from the Priest in Charge and Parish Notices

Dear Friends

It seems such a long time since I last wrote. So much has happened.

Today we farewell Bishop Victoria at a service in the Transitional Cathedral. She has served this Diocese for just on ten tumultuous years. I feel very privileged that I was the first Deacon that she ordained a Priest. No other Bishop has had such trauma, in recent times, of such a devastating earthquake and its after-effects. This parish has been on its own tumultuous journey in that time.

One of my favourite authors is Timothy Radcliffe, a Dominican Friar. In his book ‘What is the Point of Being a Christian?’ he writes, beginning with a quote from D.H. Lawrence:

The optimist builds himself safe inside a cell

                And paints the inside walls sky blue

                And blocks up the door

                And says he’s in heaven.

 

“Maybe the Church endures moments of crisis so that God may demolish the optimistic cells in which we take refuge. He knocks down the blue walls so that the sunlight may shine in and we may come out. At a solemn profession the then Provincial of the English Province, Ian Hislop preached. He was a craggy fierce Scottish convert from Presbyterianism. He said,

“I am coming to the end of my religious life and you are now beginning yours. As I look back over my religious life, and it has been a long one, I think of all that I have laboured to build and support. Often I have laboured hard to construct something, to leave some monument behind me, when, inevitably, some idiot has come along after me and torn down all that I have built and called it progress. So, I want to give you this piece of counsel, whatever schemes you may hatch, whatever plans you may formulate be sure of one thing, God will frustrate them.

“This may look like Calvinist pessimism, but it is not. Our dreams are too small, and if God demolishes them it is so that we may venture out into the larger space of his life. God liberates us from small ambitions so that we may learn to hope more extravagantly.”

On this the day of our AGM, we are also asking you to reflect on how we will use the time, skills, money and resources at our disposal, both as individuals and as a parish. At the back of the church is a letter and a leaflet asking us all to consider the gifts of God’s Grace.

The Reverend Anne Price

Parish Notices

  • Today 11:45 am: Annual General Meeting in the parish hall.
  • Today 5:00 pm: Bishop’s Farewell Eucharist at the Cathedral.
  • Giving receipts available today at the back of the church.
  • S. Michael’s School is on holiday until 30 April.
  • Bible Study Group meets tomorrow, 7:15 pm in the parish lounge. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Women’s Fellowship: Tuesday 10:30 am in the parish lounge. Claire Preston will speak about the Franciscans. All welcome. Details Pat Evans (358 0127).
  • Meditation Group meets in the Lady Chapel on Wednesdays at 12 noon. Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • Vicarage Building Fund: soup and home baking next Sunday, delicious food for you to buy and enjoy, so please remember to bring cash. Many thanks to parishioners, S. Michael’s School and friends who supported the Easter raffle drawn last Sunday.
  • Anglo-Catholic Hui with Bishop Steven Benford: Dunedin 9–11 August. Programme to include presentations on sacraments, mission, the Holy Spirit, Church growth, work with children and youth, and spirituality. Enquiries: Fr Michael vicar@allsaintsdn.org.nz
  • Easter flowers: thank you for your generous donations.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts
    of groceries and other household items.

Letter and Parish Notices

An extract from the Vicar’s letter for Low Sunday 2016

Dear Friends,

Welcome to S. Michael’s as we continue the joyful celebration of the resurrection
of our Lord Jesus Christ. Easter, at fifty days, is the longest season in the Church’s
calendar, which emphasises the importance of the resurrection as the central tenet
of the Christian faith.

We begin the season by reading the Gospel accounts of Jesus’ appearances to his
disciples. This week we hear of his appearance on the evening of that first day, and
the subsequent appearance when Thomas was with the disciples. We might
wonder why Thomas was not with the disciples on that first occasion. Perhaps he
had to duck out for some food, or perhaps he was beginning to waver in his
commitment to the band of disciples. The disciples who were there repeated the
words of Mary Magdalene to him, “We have seen the Lord.” This wasn’t enough for
Thomas. He wanted the firsthand experience of the risen Jesus that he had missed
by being away.

This is a reminder to us that continuing to meet together Sunday by Sunday needs
to be our priority whenever possible. Each time we meet, the Lord is present to us in
his body and blood: each time we meet he shows us something of himself that is
unique. We discover this also reflected in the body of people who are present,
which is unique in time and space.

Christ is risen! Alleluia!

Parish Annual General Meeting
All parishioners are encouraged to be present at this meeting,
which will take place in the hall next Sunday immediately after morning tea.
Nomination forms and annual reports are available today.

Bishop Victoria’s Farewell Eucharist
Transitional Cathedral next Sunday at 5:00 pm.
All welcome.

Parish Notices

  •  The Easter Raffle will be drawn today. Last tickets may be purchased at morning tea before the draw. Thank you to everyone for your support.
  • Giving envelopes are available today at the back of the church.
  • S. Michael’s School is now on holiday until 30 April.
  • Meditation Group meets in the Lady Chapel on Wednesdays at 12 noon.Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • The Parish Trust meets on Wednesday at 5:15 pm.
  • Quaker Forum—The Purpose of a City: Neville Reilly, Civil Defence.Wednesday 7:30 pm at the Quaker Centre, 217 Ferry Road. Details on poster.
  • Bible Study Group resumes 16 April. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Youth Groups meet next on 2 May.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts
    of groceries and other household items.

 

Letter from the Priest in charge and Parish Notices

Dear All

The week ahead is full of textures and colours that inform our very being. Think of the many ways we use our bodies and the gifts of creation in the liturgies of Holy Week: We wave palm branches. We kneel at the proclamation of the Death of the Lord. We use water to wash one another’s feet. We touch or kiss the wood of the cross. The Easter Vigil alone offers us a symphony for our bodily senses—fire, incense, bells, water, oil, and of course, bread and wine. As we enter into the mysteries from Palm/Passion Sunday through the Resurrection joy of Easter, we can pray with the fullness of our own bodies. One poignant and tragic moment during the arrest of Jesus is Peter’s denial, a moment that is both heartbreaking and familiar.

Caravaggio’s The Denial of Saint Peter invites us into this moment with psychological intensity. We meet three characters standing together in the dark of night: a military guard, a maidservant, and Saint Peter himself. The visual narrative moves from left to right. The guard turns toward the maidservant, while she regards him with intensity. Her starkly-lit face symbolizes the harsh and condemning truth she is sharing about Peter’s denial. The guard’s face is in darkness, showing that he does not yet fully understand, but he is leaning in to hear and eyeing Peter carefully. His raised hand with an extended finger shows his understanding dawning. The maid’s hands right behind his are more clearly accusatory, pointing right at Peter.

Peter is at the right side of the scene, cast in a softer light. His hands point to his own chest, offering a self-condemning conclusion to the movement of hands in the scene. Though he did deny the Lord three times, it was his fear speaking, not his understanding. After the cock crowed, he realized the truth of what had happened. Jesus had foretold the scene, not condemning but plainly stating Peter’s need for healing, forgiveness, and faith. This truth casts Peter in the soft light of compassion, and he is able to turn his hands inward as if to accept the need for healing and forgiveness.

Caravaggio’s depiction of Peter also emphasizes the complexity of betrayal. We truly see Peter’s heartbreaking guilt, which will lead him to weep bitterly. Peter did contribute to the suffering brought on the Lord, sharing in the role of executioner, not physically but by his abandonment and denial. 

The story of the Passion is full of moments of violence, tragedy, heartache, and pain. May we stand with Peter around the fire in the soft light of healing truth.

The Reverend Anne Price

Parish Notices

  • Preparations for Easter: Donations for flowers to Jill Woodside or to the parish office; Working bee for brass cleaning etc: Saturday 10:00 am in the lounge; Floral Cross: please bring garden flowers next Sunday morning.
  • For Maundy Thursday: If you would like to take part in the foot washing during the Mass, please sign the list at the back of the church. After the Mass, the Blessed Sacrament remains on the Altar of Repose until the next day. Membersof the congregation keep watch for an hour during the night. If you can do this,please sign the list at the back of the church so that we can ensure that at least
    two people are present at all times. Details Stephen Woodside (338 9590).
  • Supper after the Easter Vigil on Saturday: please bring finger food to share.
  • Easter Raffle: tickets on sale today, $2 each or 3 for $5. To be drawn on 8 April.
  • Deadline Tuesday for material for Holy Week and Easter Trumpets.
  • Vestry meets on Tuesday, beginning with Mass at 6:00 pm.
  • Meditation Group meets in the Lady Ch apel on Wednesday at 12 noon.Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • Daylight saving ends next weekend: clocks go back one hour.
  • Lunch at Regatta on Avon: Easter Day 12 noon. Details Alice.
  • Palm Sunday to Easter 2017: if you would like to read Fr Andrew’s sermons(in print or by email) copies are available from the parish office.
  • The Women’s Fellowship thanks everyone who supported the soup and baking stall
    last Sunday. Your generosity is appreciated.
  • Parish AGM 15 April: reports to parish office please.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. CDs also available. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your giftsof groceries and other household items.

Letter from the Priest in charge and Parish Notices

Dear All

This Sunday begins the fortnight of Passiontide. As summer fades into Autumn and the leaves begin to turn. So we turn our heads towards Holy Week and the Cross. Let this week be one where you pause, reflect and pray, before we journey together into Holy Week.

During his lifetime, Vincent van Gogh painted a number of works with the sower and with wheat fields. This particular image is one of the sower with the setting sun, and stands by the Japanese-style tree transecting the image. The use of colour is also remarkable: the yellow sun, green sky, pink clouds, purple fields, the black-blue tree and the blue-green figure give us a surreal colour palette. We feel it’s the end of a cold day, despite the large sun. The surreal colours also hint at an otherworldly reality. The image is deeply evocative of death and letting go, though the subject matter of sowing seeds also brings with it the themes of hope and anticipation of new life.

Three elements form the major parts of the image: the yellow sun, the dark tree branch, and the blue-green figure of the sower. For van Gogh, these were regular symbols; the sun evoked the divine and the sower anticipated the future. These two together give us a sense of the end times with hope for the Reign of God. Along these lines, the tree, especially in its stark darkness as it transects the image, is evocative of the cross. One does not get to experience the promise of future hope and fullness without grappling with the reality of the cross.

A beautiful gesture offered by the sower is one of letting go. Casting the golden seeds on the purple ground is more than just a perfunctory act—it is letting go, literally and figuratively, so that these seeds may find good soil and so that new life may emerge. Jesus’ words from the Gospel echo throughout the painting: “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains just a single grain; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.” Death here pertains to the seed, to Jesus foreshadowing his own Passion, and to each of us facing finitude, both daily and at the end of our lives. Yet, the seeds which the sower drops are golden, reflecting the large sun dominating the back of the image and reflecting the eternal life of the divine. In the field, the sower carries on, even as he nears the tree, with determination, resolve, and hope.

Commentary is by Daniella Zsupan-Jerome, assistant professor of liturgy, catechesis, and evangelization at Loyola University New Orleans.

 

Parish Notices

  • Vicarage Building Fund: home baking and pottles of soup provided by the Women’s Fellowship are available today in the hall after Mass. Please give generously.
  • Easter Raffle: wonderful prizes on offer. Tickets available today, $1 each or 3 for $5. To be drawn on Low Sunday.
  • Palm Sunday to Easter 2017: if you would like to read Fr Andrew’s sermons (in print or by email) please contact the parish office before Friday to receive your copy by Sunday.
  • Stations of the Cross: today at 5:00 pm.
  • Bible Study Group meets tomorrow, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Women’s Fellowship meets Tuesday 10:30 am in the parish lounge. Margaret Burrell will speak about the Rebirth of Drama in the Western World from its beginning within the Easter Mass. Please remember items for Walsh House. All welcome. Details Pat Evans (358 0127).
  • Meditation Group meets in the Lady Chapel on Wednesday at 12 noon. Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • Lent Study Groups: Thursday at 11:00 am and 6:00 pm.
  • Palm Sunday ceremonies begin at 9:30 am in the school atrium.
  • Parish AGM 15 April: reports to parish office by next Sunday please.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. CDs also available. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts of groceries and other household items.

Letter from the Priest in charge and Parish Notices

Dear All

I am often thinking about the speed with which time seems to pass, but here we are more that half way through Lent. I was drawn into this weeks image where time seems to have stopped, and voices seem to be heard in whispers. Our lives seem to be led in exactly the opposite, in the brightest of lights and an ever turning travellator. So take a moment to reflect upon this image. What would you say if you had precious moments with Jesus?

From James Tissot’s famous Bible illustration series, the Interview between Jesus and Nicodemus strives to depict with careful attention to period detail the scene from John’s Gospel in which Nicodemus seeks out Jesus at night to learn more from him about his teaching.

Tissot researched his Bible series by traveling to the Holy Land, and the details in clothing, furnishings, and domestic life all help transport the viewer into the world of the Bible, or at least the Middle East at the turn of the 20th century. Even more compelling than the setting, though, is the intimacy between the figures of Jesus and Nicodemus. The image communicates the hospitality, warmth, and friendship that are available to us no matter who we are or when we arrive at Christ’s door.

Jesus and Nicodemus are seated close to one another. One can almost hear their hushed tones, their low voices so as not to disturb the sleeping world around them. Jesus embodies hospitality—he looks squarely yet kindly at Nicodemus as he explains to him what has become the most quoted passage of the New Testament: “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son.” Jesus reaches over with one hand to reassure Nicodemus and invite his friendship. There is no sense in Christ that Nicodemus is intruding at this late hour, but he welcomes him and meets him where he is with kindness and truth. Nicodemus leans in and looks down; he is listening intently and seems deeply moved by the words.

With this understanding, the removed shoes in front of the mat, a sign of domestic tradition, here become symbols of something more: the holy ground of encounter between Jesus and Nicodemus, a holy ground for friendship and reconciliation, for healing and finding truth.

Commentary is by Daniella Zsupan-Jerome, assistant professor of liturgy, catechesis, and evangelization at Loyola University New Orleans.

The Reverend Anne Price

 

Parish Notices

  • Communion at 3: is going to be a little different today. Meeting for a social get-together at 4:00 pm before going to the Cathedral at 5:00 pm to support Revd Anne who is preaching there at Evensong. Evensong at S. Michael’s as usual at 7:00 pm.
  • Stations of the Cross: Sundays at 5:00 pm during Lent.
  • Bible Study Group meets weekly during Lent, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Meditation Group meets in the Lady Chapel on Wednesdays at 12 noon. Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • Parish Trust meets Wednesday 5:15 pm in the parish lounge.
  • Lent Study Groups: Thursdays at 11:00 am and 6:00 pm in the parish lounge.
  • Vicarage Building Fundraiser: the Women’s Fellowship will make available takeaway soup and home baking once a month in the hall after Mass, in return for a generous donation to the Vicarage Building Fund. This will begin next Sunday—please bring plenty of spare cash!
  • Donations for Easter flowers may be given to Jill Woodside or the Wardens on Sundays or left in the parish office during the week.
  • Parish AGM 15 April: reports to parish office by 25 March please.
  • Double knitting or 4 ply wool, any colour, needed to make hats for distribution through Walsh House. Please place in basket at the back of the church.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts of groceries and other household items.

Letter from the Priest in charge and Parish Notices

Dear All,

I am a visual person, I tend to think and remember far more accurately through images. This week’s painting is one that challenges and draws the eye into the raw emotions. Please do look at this on line and see for yourselves the detail.


Quentin Matsys, the Flemish master of the 16th century, was known for his caricature painting and satirical commentary. In his Jesus Chasing the Merchants from the Temple, we see his caricatural style shine. Each person in this image has a unique expression, even the lamb being carried away in the centre of the scene. Matsys was not one for flattery—the faces of some of the merchants border on grotesque, though not all. He is careful to maintain these as human faces, ones we can identify with and see ourselves in.
The scene includes the range of characters noted in the Gospel story. Christ is in the centre, driving out the merchants with his rope whip, three merchants receiving his blows. One of them, perhaps a money changer, lies on the ground, his table flipped, his coins scattered. Another merchant is just making his escape with a lamb on his back, while the most grotesque one on the left is trying to get away with his goods under his arms. In the back left, three distinguished-looking men observe—these are perhaps the Jewish leaders who debate with Christ about the Temple in John’s
Gospel. To the right of the scene are three additional onlookers: one more merchant partially concealed by a sack, a seated figure, and a Temple-goer, whom we see in profile.
The setting evokes the idea of the Temple, but in fact it is a high-Gothic church contemporary to the artist’s time, perhaps the Cathedral of Antwerp, the town where the artist was most active. Likewise, the colourful clothes each character wears tell us that Matsys set this scene not in the Temple of first-century Jerusalem, but in his own 16th century. This is a not-so-subtle satirical commentary suggesting that perhaps the Church at his time needed Jesus’ cleansing. Yet, through the use of thoroughly human faces, it is not just the people of Matsys’s time that needed repentance and
purification. The image invites us to see ourselves in it as well, to see and acknowledge honestly those areas of our lives needing a major cleaning. The variety of faces offer several entry points for us—the person on the ground, the one escaping, the one looking on, the one hiding, the one at a critical
distance—where do we find ourselves in this image?

Commentary is by Daniella Zsupan-Jerome, assistant professor of liturgy, catechesis, and evangelisationat Loyola University New Orleans.

The Reverend Anne Price

Parish Notices

  • Lunch at Regatta on Avon: today at 12 noon. Details Alice.
  • Flowers for Mothering Sunday: please bring small posies for blessing and giving to mothers and caregivers next Sunday, when we will be joined by the school community.
  • Communion at 3: next Sunday at 3:00 pm.
  • Stations of the Cross: Sundays at 5:00 pm during Lent.
  • Bible Study Group meets weekly during Lent, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Climate Action Group meets in the parish lounge on Tuesday at 1:30 pm.
  • Needlework Group meets in the parish lounge on Tuesday at 7:15 pm. Details Ros Calvert (322 6078).
  • Meditation Group meets in the Lady Chapel on Wednesdays at 12 noon. Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • Lent Study Groups: Thursdays at 11:00 am and 6:00 pm in the parish lounge.
  • Saturday Breakfast: 10 March at 9:45 am in the parish lounge. Details Ros Calvert.
  • Parish AGM 15 April: reports to parish office by 25 March please.
  • Double knitting or 4 ply wool, any colour, needed to make hats for distribution through Walsh House. Please place in basket at the back of the church.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts of groceries and other household items.

Letter from the Priest in charge and Parish Notices

Dear All

In the vestry, at the moment, is the figure of Jesus in a glass of water. He is happily growing, his glass is now a little small. I am using this toy as an example for school to show that Lent is a time for us to draw close to God. This week’s Gospel reading from Mark is the Transfiguration of Jesus. In his Transfiguration, we see an anticipation of the glory of Jesus’ Resurrection. The disciples cannot possibly understand Jesus’ Transfiguration until they also witness his passion and death. We hear the story of Jesus’ Transfiguration early in Lent, but we have the benefit of hindsight. In our hearing of it, we anticipate Jesus’ Resurrection, even as we prepare to remember Jesus’ passion and death.

Francesco Zuccarelli invites us into the Transfiguration of Christ in his painting. Present in the scene are the key characters of the Gospel story: Peter, the bearded elder whose symbolic keys rest on the grass in front of him, John the youngest in the middle of the Apostles, and James, arms thrown upward. Christ himself is luminous in the cloud, flanked by Moses to the left and Elijah to the right—symbols of the Law and the prophets.

The figures tell the story through their expressive gestures. Peter is almost prostrate in adoration, James’s arms are raised in praise, and John rests in a pious bow. Zuccarelli offer three versions here of what a person’s natural response might be to such an amazing experience of the divine.  Christ’s own gesture is one of openness, embrace, and ascent. He is giving himself fully to his Father with luminous and serene expression. Moses and Elijah are the steadiest figures of the scene—figures of heavenly transcendence breaking in to our reality with an otherworldly centeredness and poise.

The most important element of this is the cloud—a common element of nature, which here becomes the vehicle that both reveals and conceals a glimpse of heaven. The cloud is heavy, with darker edges on the outside, and it lightens toward the centre. It has a dimensionality to it, as if its centre is a portal, an opening that invites us into an ever-brightening depth. Clouds normally reflect the light, but this one seems to generate its own—or it holds within itself a source of immense brightness, which tells us, “This is my beloved Son. Listen to him.” Bringing together heaven and earth, the Transfiguration is a comprehensive experience in which the divine voice addresses the human heart through all of its senses.

Commentary is by Daniella Zsupan-Jerome, assistant professor of liturgy, catechesis, and evangelization at Loyola University New Orleans.

The Reverend Anne Price

Parish Notices

  •  Christian World Service appeal to assist Tongan communities affected by Cyclone Gita. Support the Tonga Trust and the churches providing help and shelter. Details 0800 74 73 72.
  • Roadworks: different road closures will be in place next weekend. See map in parish lounge.
  • Communion: today at 3:00 pm.
  • Stations of the Cross: Sundays at 5:00 pm during Lent.
  • Bible Study Group meets weekly during Lent, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Vestry meets on Tuesday, beginning with Mass at 7:00 pm.
  • Meditation Group meets in the Lady Chapel on Wednesday at 12 noon. Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • Lent Study Groups: Thursdays at 11:00 am and 6:00 pm in the parish lounge.
  • Canterbury Shakespeare Society: Thursday, 7:30 pm in the parish lounge.
  • World Day of Prayer: Friday 10:00 am in the Knox Hall. Details on poster.
  • Double knitting or 4 ply wool, any colour, needed to make hats for distribution through Walsh House. Please place in basket at the back of the church.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts of groceries and other household items.

 

Letter from the Priest in charge and Parish Notices

Dear All

Lent has begun. Ashes imposed. The Loyola Press website has a wonderful sequence of Visual Prayer through Lent, below is the image and commentary for the first week of Lent. Enjoy the Journey.

The scene of The Temptation of Christ is a 12th–century detail of the magnificent mosaic of St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice. In its full context, it is situated in the barrel vault of the south arm of the transept. The temptation scene is right above the scene of Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem.

On a golden background depicting the heavenly realm, the mosaic tells the story of Jesus’ temptation through a series of symbols. Moving from left to right, the figures of Christ and the devil repeat in a pattern. Each set evokes one of the temptations of Christ through key images: bread, the pinnacle of the Temple, and the mountain top with all riches of the world. The angels on the right who come to minister to Christ close the visual narrative, as the devil flees downward under them to escape the scene.

This presentation of the temptation story assumes that the viewer is familiar with it. Each of the symbols serves to jog our memory and help us recall the story we already know. In this sense, the mosaic relies on the viewer to be the real storyteller, while the artwork simply summarizes the highlights as reminders along the way. By casting the viewer as storyteller, the artwork invites us into the story in a special way, challenging us to share the Good News of it with others.

The figure of Christ in this mosaic sequence is unique—it is not the man who endured the desert for 40 days among wild animals, but Christ the Lawgiver, holding a scroll in one hand, strong, steady, and wearing dignified robes. Christ the Lawgiver reminds us that each time he rebuked the devil, he did so by referring to the written Word, the truth of God manifest in the Scriptures. Each time the hunger for food, for assurance from God, and for an easier way tempted him, Jesus found steady ground again recalling the Word of God—the source of where he came from and who he was called to be.

Commentary is by Daniella Zsupan-Jerome, assistant professor of liturgy, catechesis, and evangelization at Loyola University New Orleans.

The Reverend Anne Price

Parish Notices

  • Christian World Service appeal to assist Tongan communities affected by Cyclone Gita. Support the Tonga Trust and the churches providing help and shelter. Details 0800 74 73 72.
  • Roadworks: please be aware of changes affecting access to our site for the next few weekends. See map in parish lounge.
  • Lent Study Groups begin this week, Thursdays at 11:00 am and 6:00 pm.
  • There will be no Stations of the Cross this week.
  • Communion: 3:00 pm on alternate Sundays, a contemplative and creative service aimed primarily at younger people, but all are welcome. Do you know anyone (especially students and young workers) who might enjoy meeting with a small group of like-minded people? Details from alice.bates@saintmichaels.co.nz or speak to Alice.
  • Youth Group 4:00–5:30 pm at S. Michael’s. Do you have any friends or family in Years 7–13 who would like to join? Details shaun.graveston@yahoo.co.nz or speak to Shaun.
  • Bible Study Group begins tomorrow, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Women’s Fellowship: the first meeting for 2018 will be on Tuesday, 10:30 am in the parish lounge. Join us for ‘Fasting, Feasting and Fellowship’. All welcome. Details Pat Evans (358 0127).
  • Meditation Group will be meeting in the Kate Kiver Room (Old Stone Building) at 12 noon on Wednesdays. Access through the main entrance to the School, then sign the visitor register in the school office. Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215)
  • Double knitting or 4 ply wool, any colour, needed to make hats for distribution through Walsh House. Please place in basket at the back of the church.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts of groceries and other household items.

 

Notice of Upcoming Road Closures

Several weekend-long road junction closures are coming to the central city – not far from Christchurch Hospital.

From 8pm on Friday 16 February until 6am on Monday 19 February, the Montreal/Tuam Streets intersection will be partly closed. There will be no access to Montreal St from Moorhouse Ave and Tuam St will be down to one lane.

This intersection will also be partly closed on the following weekend, 23-26 February.

The weekend after that 2-5 March, the work moves on to the Durham/Tuam Streets intersection.

Please be aware of these works and expect delays around the intersections.

Letter from the Priest in charge and Parish Notices

Dear All,

On Sunday 4 February the parish of S. Michael and all Angels welcomed Miss Penny Tattershaw as the new Principal of S. Michael’s Church School. Bishop Victoria, who preached and presided, spoke of the long tradition of the Church in education, of the special character of Anglican schools and of hope, the essence of our faith, as the most important gift that we can give our children.
S. Michael’s pupils then played a leading role in the Induction ceremony, presenting their Principal with the symbolic keys of the school, a laptop, textbook and exercise book and a candle, a “reminder of our Baptismal vow that we are to shine as the light of Christ in the world”.
Finally, Dr Averil Worner, Principal of St Mark’s School, said the intercessions, reinforcing the Bishop’s message, “We thank you for the gift of Anglican schools, where the message of your life, death and resurrection is proclaimed, Christian fellowship is experienced, service to everyone is modelled and worship of you is encouraged and cultivated.” She concluded by giving voice to the prayer of all those present: “Surround her with Christian love and people who give her wings to fly in service to you.”
The parish looks forward to supporting Penny in her new role, both now and in the future.

Gloria Moyle

This week brings us Shrove Tuesday and in turn leads to Ash Wednesday. It isone of those pivotal moments when we are brought face to face with our own mortality with those words ‘Remember you are dust and to dust you shall return’.
Our Lent study Receiving Christ in five different ways, these ways being ‘As children of God’, ‘In the stranger and the needy’, ‘In Holy Communion; through prayer and fellowship’, and ‘Christ in you, the hope of glory’, will begin the following week. It is an ecumenical course bringing to us the opinions and thoughts of leading Christian thinkers: Bishop Nick Baines (Anglican), Margaret Sentamu (an independent diversity and leadership development consultant), Revd Dr Ken Howcroft (former President of the Methodist Conference) and Theodora Hawksley (an academic theologian now a novice at Bar Convent, in York). The groups run on a listen, read and discuss format.
A group will meet in Rolleston (details Jenny Daniels 347 7629) and two groups at S. Michael’s, one at 11:00 am and the other at 6:00 pm on Thursdays. It is also a course that is designed for both discussion groups and individuals. For more information don’t hesitate to contact me.

The Reverend Anne Price

  •  Ash Wednesday this week: please return your palm crosses to be made into ashes.
  • Communion at Three is a contemplative and creative service aimed primarily at younger people, but all are welcome. We meet every fortnight at 3:00 pm on Sunday (beginning today). Do you know anyone (especially students and young workers) who might enjoy meeting with a small group of like-minded people? For more information email alice.bates@saintmichaels.co.nz or speak to Alice.
  • Roadworks: please be aware of changes which will occur this week on Oxford Tce affecting access to our site.
  • Shrove Tuesday: you are invited to join the Parish celebration, Tuesday at 3:00 pm. Pancake races, competitions and the all-important eating! Come and join in, or, sit in the shade and watch the school children having lots of fun.
  • Youth Group begins on Ash Wednesday, 4:00–5:30 pm at S. Michael’s. Do you have any friends or family in Years 7–13 who would like to join our group? For more information email shaun.graveston@yahoo.co.nz or speak to Shaun.
  • Lenten Quiet Day: conducted by Fr Ben Randall on Saturday, 10:00 am–3:00 pm at the Community of the Sacred Name, 300 Tuam Street. All are welcome, please bring something to share for lunch together.
  • Bible Study Group begins on 19 February, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
  • Women’s Fellowship: the first meeting for 2018 will be on 20 February, 10:30 am in the parish lounge. Join us for ‘Fasting, Feasting and Fellowship’. All welcome. Details Pat Evans (358 0127).
  • Meditation Group first meeting on 21 February 12 noon in the Kate Kiver Room (Old Stone Building). Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215).
  • Christmas flowers: thanks to all who so generously made donations.
  • Double knitting or 4 ply wool, any colour, needed to make hats for distribution through Walsh House. Please place in basket at the back of the church.
  • Book Swap: in the parish lounge. Koha to parish.
  • Inasmuch basket: please continue to support the City Mission with your gifts of groceries and other household items.