Letter from the Vicar 2 August 2015

Fr Andrew Starky small

Dear Friends,

Welcome to S. Michael’s today. The main theme of this morning’s reading from the letter to the Ephesians is the unity of the Church in one Spirit. The writer begs the Ephesians to live a life worthy of their calling with all humility, gentleness, patience, bearing with each other and making every effort to sustain the unity of the Church in the bond of peace.

We recall these sentiments when we come to the Peace in the Mass. In some places it can seem like an intermission, but that mistakes its intention. The sharing of the Peace is actually a very solemn part of the Mass. The words that follow draw us towards the intent of the action and they are inspired by this passage:

E te whanau, we are the Body of Christ. By one Spirit we were baptised into one body.
Keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. Amen. We are bound by the love of Christ.

By these words we recall who we are. We are not separate individuals, but rather we are part of a body and we got there through baptism in the Holy Spirit. The unity of the Church is not something that we have to strive for humanly, indeed it is beyond our striving anyway. The unity of the Church is a given and our choice is whether or not we live into it. Even in the microcosm of this congregation, we know how costly this can be. The sharing of the Peace should remind us of this cost every time.

Our unity, though, runs well beyond this congregation. We are part of a diocese, part of a worldwide communion, indeed part of the one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church. During the last fifty years there have been substantial moves towards unity in the attitudes of Churches and Christians towards one another on the ground. Many of us remember the fraught issues that once divided families between denominations, and today we can scarcely imagine how that could happen.

However, this progress has not been matched by the resolution of historical and contemporary signs of division, and the pain of broken or impaired communion remains. In our own communion, for example, we still find that women’s ordained ministry is not fully recognised in many Anglican dioceses and parishes, and we continue to find ourselves, as a Church, unable to treat gay people with the dignity they deserve. These and other issues represent the current growing pains of the Church and call us to humility as we read the final challenging verses:

But speaking the truth in love, we must grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ, from whom the whole body, joined and knitted together by every ligament with which it is equipped, as each part is working properly, promotes the body’s growth in building itself up in love.

Yours in Christ,

Fr Andrew Starky

 

Parish Notices

Christchurch City Mission: many are still struggling to cope in winter conditions. Please continue to bring food and other household items for the Inasmuch Basket. Clothing and larger items may be delivered directly to 276 Hereford St.
Sales Table: in the hall after Mass. Details Anne Ladd (981 5012).
• There is a cup of tea or coffee after the evening service each Sunday.
• The Bible Study Group meets tomorrow, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
• The Needlework Group meets on Tuesday, 7:15 pm in the parish lounge. Details Ros Calvert (322 6078).
Vege Co-op: orders and deliveries on Wednesdays. Details Kathryn Starky.
• The Canterbury Shakespeare Society meets on Thursday, 7:30 pm in the lounge.

Celebration of the Festival of the Holy Name
Mass at CSN Retreat House with Bishop Victoria
Preacher: Fr Andrew Starky
Friday at 10:30 am, followed by morning tea.

Saturday Breakfast: 8 August, 9:45 am in the parish lounge. Details Anne Ladd.
Meet People of Differing Faiths: next Sunday 4:00 pm at Elmwood Bowling Club.
Go Tell the Gospel: Jay Behan. 15 August, 10:15 am at S. Christopher’s.
Book Swap/Donate/Share with a Friend/Give as a gift: Modern books that you have enjoyed. Fundraising koha to Anne at the sales table. Books available in parish lounge during the week and in the hall on Sundays.
Box lots of books are welcome at any S. Christopher’s Dove Book Shop.

Organ Recital by Jeremy Woodside
Sunday 2nd August at 2:00 pm
Featuring works by Bach, Elgar, Widor
and the New Zealand première of
Fractures: In Memoriam by Matthew Everingham
first performed by Jeremy at Westminster Abbey 22 February 2015
Door Sales: Adults $20/ Students $10

Letter from the Vicar 26 July 2015

Fr Andrew Starky small

Dear Friends,

Welcome to S. Michael’s. I am delighted to tell you that we are resuming children’s ministry in the 10:00 am Mass today. Children’s Church will take place during the Ministry of the Word as before. This name indicates an intention that the children will participate in a liturgy that parallels what the adults are doing and reflects the traditions of S. Michael’s. Please pray for this ministry to grow.

Today we reflect on the well-known stories of Jesus feeding the five thousand, and his walking on the sea and calming it. This begins a series of readings over the next few weeks from the sixth chapter of John’s Gospel, which contains a rich reflection on the bread of life. This passage has contributed much to the Church’s Eucharistic understanding. These weeks provide us with a sustained opportunity to meditate on the Eucharist and our participation in it.

The Epistle reading contains prayers that are undoubtedly being prayed for our benefit by the saints in heaven, and that we can pray for Christians in other places. As we begin to meditate on the Eucharist in these weeks, these prayers could also form part of our personal devotions. In this, you might consider altering the pronouns into the first person.

I pray that, according to the riches of his glory, he may grant that we may be strengthened in our inner being with power through his Spirit, and that Christ may dwell in our hearts through faith, as we are being rooted and grounded in love.

I pray that we may have the power to comprehend, with all the saints, what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, so that we may be filled with all the fullness of God.

The final sentence of the Epistle reading has been frequently repeated by Bishop Victoria as she has sought to encourage the diocese. It has taken on particular significance as we have struggled through the earthquakes and the recovery phase. In a couple of weeks’ time we reach a critical funding application deadline in relation to the Old Stone Building. There is still some work to be done to complete the application by engineers and others, under the guidance of the Church Property Trustees. Please pray that this deadline will be met and for the success of the application so that the project can be accomplished next year.

Yours in Christ,
Fr Andrew Starky

Parish Notices

Christchurch City Mission: many are still struggling to cope in winter conditions. Please continue to bring food and other household items for the Inasmuch Basket. Clothing and larger items may be delivered directly to 276 Hereford St.
Sales Table: in the hall after Mass. Details Anne Ladd (981 5012).
• There is a cup of tea or coffee after the evening service each Sunday.
• The Vestry meets on Tuesday, beginning with Mass at 7:00 pm.
Vege Co-op: orders and deliveries on Wednesdays. Details Kathryn Starky.
• The Bible Study Group meets next on 3 August, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
• The Needlework Group meets next on 4 August, 7:15 pm in the parish lounge. Details Ros Calvert (322 6078).
Celebration of the Festival of the Holy Name: Mass at CSN Retreat House 7 August at 10:30 am, followed by morning tea.
Cecilian Singers Concert: today 3:00 pm at the Elmwood Auditorium, $20.
Book Launch: Slipping the Moorings by Richard Randerson. Today 6:00 pm at the Cathedral for refreshments and panel discussion.
Book Swap/Donate/Share with a Friend/Give as a gift: Modern books that you have enjoyed. Fundraising koha to Anne at the sales table. Books available in parish lounge during the week and in the hall on Sundays.
Box lots of books are welcome at any S. Christopher’s Dove Book Shop.

Organ Recital by Jeremy Woodside
S. Michael’s, 2 August at 2:00 pm
Featuring works by Bach, Elgar, Widor
and the New Zealand première of
Fractures: In Memoriam by Matthew Everingham
first performed by Jeremy at Westminster Abbey 22 February 2015
Door sales: Tickets $20, concessions $10

Sermon by Fr Andrew Starky 19 July 2015

OS 16 Jeremiah 23: 1-6, Ephesians 2: 11-22, Mark 6: 30-34, 53-56

Compassion has been called the bridge between sympathy and action. Sympathy involves our feelings and it is about how we identify with the situation of someone else. Sympathy is certainly not a bad thing and we can feel sympathetic about lots of situations from people we know, things we hear about in the media, world conflicts, and climate change for example. Sympathy is the seedbed of compassion. It is from our sympathies that our compassion will arise. Prayer nourishes this development.

You’ve heard me say that our vocation is where the deep joy of our heart meets the deep need of the world. In this sense, vocation is a synonym for compassion. It defines where we are called to be. Jesus revealed that the nature of God is compassion. Abraham Heschel called the prophetic tradition of Israel, ‘divine pathos’. He wrote, “God does not reveal himself in abstract absoluteness, but in a personal and intimate relation to the world. God is moved and affected by what happens in the world… God is concerned about the world and shares its fate. Indeed, this is the essence of God’s moral nature: His willingness to be intimately involved in the history of man.”

At Easter we particularly call to mind the passion of Christ which is simply the incarnation, or the making present among us, of the passion of God.

The word compassion has been somewhat cheapened in our language through being linked to pity. The critical thing about compassion that separates it from both sympathy and pity is that you can’t do it from afar. Compassion means suffering with. As Douglas Hall says, “You do not have compassion, really, unless you suffer with those to whom you refer. The precondition for compassion is unconditional solidarity with the ones for whom you feel it.”

Compassion comes from the depths of our being, our guts and the motivating force of anger can often be in the emotional mix. We ask, “How can this be?”

After the first earthquake our Bishop surprised many in the diocese by calling us to donate $200,000 to the people of Haiti. They had suffered the same level of earthquake as us, but had suffered loss of life and property on a far greater level than we had with much less help for recovery. Bishop Victoria’s action was compassion. Some years before she had spent time in Haiti serving among the poor, and it had changed her whole life direction. She wanted us to know how by helping them we could learn about compassion: action borne of suffering in solidarity with another.

Jesus and his disciples were heading off for a weekend retreat until they were interrupted by a great and needy crowd. Not something you would want to happen on the parish away day.

Jesus saw this great crowd as he went ashore and he had compassion for them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd. They lacked leadership and focus. Jeremiah indicates the poverty that has come on his people through leaders who have put their own interests ahead of their people. Today we call it corruption. The people are scattered, he says; they are driven away; they are not attended to.

In our own time, in this society, people are very much like sheep without a shepherd. In fact the very definition of a post-modern society could be ‘like sheep without a shepherd’. Some of this is the mood of the age we live in. However, we also must acknowledge that the shepherding of the church has not always been good. The church has often been too caught up in its own interests and even arrogant. We have often failed to listen well enough, and not met the urgent and real hunger of people who came to us for help, let alone gone out and sought the hungry. We are now also allowing hostilities within our own body to deflect our compassion rather than trusting the peace that was gained for us on the cross by Christ. We need to repent of these things.

Jesus didn’t say to this crowd, I am your shepherd, your leader, come and follow me. He began to teach them many things. When it grew late and the disciples wanted to send the people away to find food, Jesus said to them, “You give them something to eat.” And that is one thing that is at the heart of the teaching. You give them something to eat. (We’ll be developing that in the next few weeks) And after the great feeding the disciples journeyed back across the sea. They got into a real pickle and were very scared. Jesus saved them in their terror. He said, “Take heart, it is I, do not be afraid.” That’s another thing that is at the heart of the teaching. And then on the other side many people rushed about bringing sick people to Jesus. They were beginning to learn about compassion. And even those who touched the fringe of his cloak were healed, and that was another thing at the heart of his teaching. Jesus showed compassion for this crowd by teaching, by feeding, by saving and by healing them. That is the mark of the Good Shepherd who knows the sheep by name and lays down his life for them.

We know that Jesus would face other crowds who were following another leadership. Their hostility would lead him to the cross where he lay down his life for us and for our salvation; his ultimate act of compassion. In this Mass we participate in Jesus’ act of compassion. As we share bread and wine together, his body and his blood, we receive his teaching, feeding, saving and healing in our need. My prayer is that as a result of this sacrament, that the amount of compassion in this congregation, in this city, in this world will grow to the glory of God.

Letter from the Vicar 19 July 2015

Fr Andrew Starky small

Dear Friends,

Welcome to S. Michael’s today.

Our readings at Mass have a theme of journey and relationships restored. The prophet Jeremiah longs for the ingathering of the flock which has been scattered because of the destruction caused by faithless and incompetent shepherds: the kings of Israel. The writer of the Letter to the Ephesians longs for peace to be made between Israel and the Gentiles. Indeed that the hostility between them may be abolished through the cross, and that they may be gathered into a household of God, a true dwelling-place of God.

In the Gospel reading also we hear about journey and we see Jesus actively directing the mission as it develops on the ground. The apostles reported back to Jesus all they had done and he then called them to withdraw to a quiet place to rest. In this instance, the new context merely becomes a further setting for Jesus’ ministry to be exercised among the needy and disorganised crowd that seeks him out.

We have come here to seek out Jesus in this Mass. Perhaps you are here to rest awhile after a busy week and to regain focus. Perhaps you are here with problems and conflicts which cry out for the peace which only Christ can give. Perhaps you are here because the Good Shepherd has drawn you back by his wisdom, justice and righteousness to equip you to stand as a beacon of light and goodness in a chaotic world. The Mass is the time when we ‘come away with Jesus by ourselves’ so that he can teach and restore us.

Many people seem to be travelling and holidaying at this time of the year. Some of our congregation are overseas, others have already returned, and some visitors are with us experiencing a Christchurch winter! Last week our family travelled over the Arthur’s Pass to the West Coast, which was a bit of an adventure as we had to use chains for part of the way. One of the highlights of our visit was a trip to Punakaiki Rocks, sometimes known as the Pancake Rocks. We managed to get there for high tide when the sea was very stormy, so the blowholes were functioning brilliantly. On our way back to Greymouth we called in on Barry and Lesta Smithson, who are part of our extended S. Michael’s family. They gave us a very warm welcome and send their greetings to all at S. Michael’s.

Yours in Christ,
Fr Andrew Starky

Parish Notices

Christchurch City Mission: many families and individuals are struggling to cope in winter conditions. The City Mission helps as many people as possible and is very grateful for our donations of food and household items. Please continue to give generously. Clothing and larger items may be delivered directly to 276 Hereford St.
Sales Table: in the hall after Mass. Anne would still be very grateful to hear from anyone who could assist as needed. Details Anne Ladd (981 5012).
• There is a cup of tea or coffee after the evening service each Sunday.
S. Michael’s School: Term 3 begins tomorrow.
• The Bible Study Group meets tomorrow, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
Vege Co-op: orders and deliveries on Wednesdays. Details Kathryn Starky.
Cecilian Singers Concert: next Sunday, 3:00 pm at the Elmwood Auditorium, $20.
Book Launch: Slipping the Moorings by Richard Randerson. Next Sunday 6:00 pm at the Cathedral for refreshments and panel discussion.
• The Needlework Group meets monthly, 7:15 pm in the parish lounge. Details Ros Calvert (322 6078).
Book Swap/Donate/Share with a Friend/Give as a gift: Modern books that you have enjoyed. Fundraising koha to Anne at the sales table. Books available in parish lounge during the week and in the hall on Sundays.
Box lots of books are welcome at any S. Christopher’s Dove Book Shop.

Organ Recital by Jeremy Woodside
S. Michael’s, 2 August at 2:00 pm
Featuring works by Bach, Elgar, Widor
and the New Zealand première of
Fractures: In Memoriam by Matthew Everingham
first performed by Jeremy at Westminster Abbey 22 February 2015
Door sales: Tickets $20, concessions $10

Letter from the People’s Warden 12 July 2015

IMG_1820

Dear Friends,

Welcome to S. Michael’s today.

It is good to be together after such a cold week, and with the promise of warmer days to come. I hope our pupils from S. Michael’s School, and others who have been on holiday this week, have been able to enjoy the rather extreme weather.

Our Scripture readings this morning speak of being chosen and being sent, and being sustained. Amos, a dresser of sycamore trees, is chosen as a prophet and sent out from his usual place. John the Baptist, also a prophet, was chosen before his birth to be the forerunner of Jesus, and he followed where he was sent. The Epistle to the Ephesians tells us again that we have been chosen by God to be his children.

One evening during the week I watched a programme made in New Zealand on horses. To me, horses are very big creatures with mighty feet and teeth. To others, they are special animals and friends.

These particular horses had been chosen from a herd of wild horses, and had been in captivity only a matter of a few months. Two of these horses, after some training, were being tested to see how well they would enter a horse-box for travelling. It was stated that to a previously wild horse, a horse-box would look like a very dark small space with no way out. One of these horses had to be really encouraged, in various ways, and after some refusal finally completed the task. The other followed its owner straight into the horse-box, with no hesitation. It seemed that trust had been established between the horse and its owner, and so it immediately did what was asked, trusting that although the situation was scary, it would not be allowed to come to any harm.

This encouraged me to wonder how well we accept the tasks to which we are sent, and how willing we are to undertake them. Let us pray that our gratitude for the grace shown to us by God, and the trust that we have in our Lord Jesus Christ, may be expressed in a trusting way.

With blessings to all,

Claire Preston

Parish Notices

Christchurch City Mission: many families and individuals are struggling to cope in winter conditions. The City Mission helps as many people as possible and is very grateful for our donations of food and household items. Please continue to give generously. Clothing and larger items may be delivered directly to 276 Hereford St.
S. Michael’s School is on holiday until 20 July.
Sales Table: in the hall after Mass. Anne would still be very grateful to hear from anyone who could assist as needed. Details Anne Ladd (981 5012).
• There is a cup of tea or coffee after the evening service each Sunday.
• The Meditation Group meets tomorrow at 5:15 pm in the parish lounge. Details Margaret Maclagan (359 9215) or Kathryn Starky (385 0197).
Choir of Christ’s College, Cambridge: concert at the Cathedral on Tuesday at 7:00 pm. Tickets available at the door.
Vege Co-op: orders and deliveries on Wednesdays. Details Kathryn Starky.
• The Bible Study Group meets next on 20 July, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
• The Needlework Group meets monthly, 7:15 pm in the parish lounge. Details Ros Calvert (322 6078).
Cecilian Singers Concert: 26 July, 3:00 pm at the Elmwood Auditorium, $20.
Residential Retreat A New Heart: Wellington 17–26 July. Cost $817. Details from arrupenz@xtra.co.nz or phone 04 383 7769.
Book Swap/Donate/Share with a Friend/Give as a gift: Modern books that you have enjoyed. Fundraising koha to Anne at the sales table. Books available in parish lounge during the week and in the hall on Sundays.
Box lots of books are welcome at any S. Christopher’s Dove Book Shop.

Fractures: In Memoriam
Jeremy Woodside Recital
2 August at 2:00 pm at S. Michael’s
Details on poster

Sermon by Fr Andrew Starky 5 July 2015

OS 14B Ezekiel 2: 1-5, 2 Corinthians 12: 2-10, Mark 1: 1-13

When I was first on the West Coast and newly ordained I got the kind of call that every priest dreads. A young couple in a nearby town had lost a baby to cot death and would I come. As I went I thought how utterly sad this was, and prayed that I might know how to be with them in this terrible tragedy.

When I arrived I went in and saw that they had already set their house up as a marae, which was not uncommon on the Coast with Maori families. Eventually I was alone with these nervous young parents who told me they didn’t know what to do, and that they were not baptised but could I help them anyway? Of course I can, I said, whilst feeling very inadequate and wondering how all this was going to work out. At times like this, in ministry, the words, “My grace is sufficient for you for power is made perfect in weakness,” might come to mind.

To stop Paul from becoming too elated with visions of paradise, a thorn was given to him in the flesh. This thorn was a tangible weakness that caused him to have to rely daily on the grace of God rather than his own strength. People have speculated as to what the thorn was, and that doesn’t really matter. Each one of us knows what a thorn in the flesh feels like. It is something that disheartens and discourages us in our ministry and faith. The technical term is desolation.

This kind of pastoral situation is a thorn. It is very disheartening to see such grief around the coffin of a little baby, and to feel so helpless. The thing that amazed me about this situation was the ministry that emerged over these days that was sufficient. Most of us hate to feel that helpless, yet if we dare to go there the power of God will never let us down.

One of the particular thorns that many of us don’t like and try to avoid is rejection. Just like Jesus, we all have our own families and networks of friends who know about us, our past, our ups and our downs. It can be very hard to do works of power among these people, because they can’t get past their own pre-conceptions of who we are or who we were. Many of us will consciously avoid situations where we could be rejected. But in doing so we greatly limit our effectiveness as bearers of grace. After the tradition of Ezekiel, Jesus was rejected in Nazareth and they took offence at him. This foreshadowed his rejection by his own people which culminated in his crucifixion.

Instead of crawling back under his stone, Jesus expanded his ministry. He went about other villages teaching. He called the twelve and sent them out in pairs with authority to undermine evil. He told them not to carry unnecessary stuff for the journey. Something the Church, particularly in Western nations has long since forgotten. When we see what vibrant ministry happens in places overseas with so little the resources that we think are necessary, it might cause us to pause for thought.

Jesus taught his disciples to accept and honour hospitality. Indeed the deep personal relationships that come through this way of relating would be at the core of his mission strategy. This had its culmination in the Last Supper where Jesus formed a new community in his body and blood of which we continue today.

But some won’t welcome you, so then as you leave shake the dust off. Which means clearly moving away, and putting energies where they will bear fruit. It also acknowledges that perhaps someone else needs to go to that house, and that us being rejected may not be the end of the matter.

And the twelve went and proclaimed that all should repent and turn to God, and they cast out many demons and anointed many with oil who were sick and cured them. These are still the priorities for mission. Calling on people to turn to God, undermining evil by helping people to trust God’s power, and caring for and healing the sick.

Fear of rejection is very real, and most of us don’t like it. It causes us to avoid situations where if we had more courage we could mediate the power of God. We tend to justify this by thinking that we haven’t got the right equipment. We haven’t got the time. We haven’t got a good enough theological education, we haven’t done enough bible study, we aren’t good enough at prayer, we haven’t got enough experience, we aren’t important enough, we are not ordained etc.

What we are really saying by these justifications is the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ is not enough because we are too scared of our own weakness.
The words “My grace is sufficient for you for power is made perfect in weakness,” are words that were spoken to St Paul by the risen Lord. They are words that represent the heart of the gospel of Christ crucified and risen. They sustained Paul’s very challenging ministry and they are words that can sustain ours too.

“My grace is sufficient for you for power is made perfect in weakness”.

Letter from the Vicar 5 July 2015

Fr Andrew Starky small

Dear Friends,

Welcome to S. Michael’s today.

Our readings at Mass lead us to reflect on the ministry of Jesus and its cost. He is facing rejection in his own town, and he begins to teach and authorise the twelve as he equips them for their mission. These things help us to reflect on the ups and downs of our own Christian journey as we walk the way of the cross alongside our Lord.

I am delighted to tell you that Leonie Ward, who is the mother of Deryk Ward, has very kindly donated her Bösendorfer grand piano to S. Michael’s. Along with Deryk and Keryn, who used to sing in our choir but now live in Sydney, Leonie and Jack in Tauranga have been wonderful supporters of S. Michael’s. All four are part of our extended family. We are extremely grateful to Leonie and Jack for thinking of us as they move house. We have enjoyed having Christopher Marshall’s beautiful piano on loan to the church in recent years and this piano will be of commensurate quality, though slightly smaller.

At the AGM we discussed ways of improving the appearance of the school and parish site along the Durham Street boundary and I would like to give the following update on progress:
• Currently the school is looking at covering the fencing around the Old Stone Building with a wrap. This solution will obviate the need to shift any masonry.
• The containers have to stay for safety’s sake, but the school is looking at repainting and putting designs on them.
• The PTFA has raised $30,000 for replacing all the fencing along the Oxford Terrace/Durham Street boundary, including the corrugated iron and the hedge. The Vestry will be asked to consider concept plans at its July meeting. It is acknowledged that final roading plans will need to be taken into account.

Yours in Christ,

Fr Andrew Starky

 

Parish Notices

Christchurch City Mission: many families and individuals are struggling to cope in winter conditions. The City Mission helps as many people as possible and is very grateful for our donations of food and household items. Please continue to give generously. Clothing and larger items may be delivered directly to 276 Hereford St.
S. Michael’s School is now on holiday until 20 July.
Sales Table: in the hall after Mass. Anne would still be very grateful to hear from anyone who could assist as needed. Details Anne Ladd (981 5012).
• There is a cup of tea or coffee after the evening service each Sunday.
• The Bible Study Group meets tomorrow, 7:15 pm in the school staffroom. Details Peter Oakley (960 0974).
• The Needlework Group meets on Tuesday, 7:15 pm in the parish lounge. Details Ros Calvert (322 6078).
Vege Co-op: orders and deliveries on Wednesdays.
Saturday Breakfast: 11 July, 9:45 am in the parish lounge. Details Anne Ladd.
Choir of Christ’s College, Cambridge: concert at the Cathedral 14 July at 7:00 pm. Tickets available at the door.
Residential Retreat A New Heart: Wellington 17–26 July. Cost $817. Details from arrupenz@xtra.co.nz or phone 04 383 7769.
Book Swap/Donate/Share with a Friend/Give as a gift: Modern books that you have enjoyed. Fundraising koha to Anne at the sales table. Books available in parish lounge during the week and in the hall on Sundays.
Box lots of books are welcome at any S. Christopher’s Dove Book Shop.